Tag Archives: slavery

REVIEW: Gate in the Fence of Time: A Journey to the Birth of America by David Robert Berry

This was a very interesting book about the Sinclair family who is able to travel back in time to 1775 and 1776 Colonial Williamsburg. Because I’ve visited the historic park a few times, I could appreciate the place names and common stories of the time period.  I greatly enjoyed this book.  Each of the four family members connected with a character from the past and hoped to make a positive difference, without changing history.  The author had done a great deal of homework in getting to some little known stories to bring to life.
Thanks to David Robert Berry for providing me an ARC for a review in my own words.

Advertisements

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

REVIEW: Glory Over Everything by by Kathleen Grissom

Jamie Pyke (a/k/a James Burton) is a complex and confused character. Perhaps it’s because of his earth-shaking upbringing and the revelations therein. He’s a 3/4 white, 1/4 black man living as a white man in 1830 Philadelphia. Life in Philadelphia has limited problems compared to his journey to North Carolina and Virginia to seek out Pan, his friend and house servant, who was stolen from the Philadelphia docks and sold as a slave. Jamie has to confront old ghosts and old ways of thinking as he journeys south and discovers his true soul.

Sometimes I was proud of Jamie in the story and other times I was embarrassed by his reactions.  It was a story that I wanted to keep reading to find out what was around the next bend.

Thanks to Simon & Schuster for providing me an ARC for a review in my own words.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

REVIEW: Mrs. Grant and Madame Jule by Jennifer Chiaverini

Mrs. Grant and Madame JuleThis book follows the life of Julia Grant (the wife of General and later President U.S. Grant) and her slave/servant/friend Jule.  I found the story captivating as it was both the love story of Julie and Ulysses Grant and also the Civil War story of Julia’s thoughts on slavery.  I had not realized that Mrs. Grant came from a slave-owning, plantation-dwelling family.  To think that she married a staunch supporter of abolition was amazing to me.  We follow the two women through young friendship, young adulthood, and then the stickier parts of life when Jule has no choice in following Julia around from pillar to post.  Julia never seems to understand Jule’s rights to a husband and family.  Even Ulysses’ careful comments about slavery don’t sway her…her thoughts are built into her character.  Maybe even bred into her character.  The history of the time period was also presented in engaging ways as there were many battles, household moves, career transitions and family drama.  Take time to get a different picture of the Civil War and read this book.

Thanks to Dutton Adult publishers for providing me an advance copy for a review in my own words.

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

REVIEW: The Invention of Wings by Sue Monk Kidd

wingsHetty “Handful” and Sarah Grimke are the stars of this novel which follows them through the different restrictions placed on slaves and women during the early 1800’s.  I enjoyed how the author alternated chapters to demonstrate the different challenges of each woman.  Hetty’s slavery was, of course, a reprehensible situation.  Sarah’s role as the privileged daughter of a plantation/land owner was also extremely restrictive.  I wondered as a read, but found out at the end, that Sarah Grimke was an historical figure.  She did write and speak about abolition, racial equality and women’s rights.  I would say that she found her wings!  Hetty and her mother, Charlotte, also found their wings in the chances they took to assert their independence even in their forced slavery.  Fabulous book!

Leave a comment

Filed under Book Reviews

REVIEW: Carolina Gold by Dorothy Love

A young woman not much over 20, Charlotte Frasier inherited the family rice plantation and a summer cottage at Pawley’s Island.  In reconstruction era South Carolina, Charlotte is determined to get the plantation back to business and actually puts in three plantings of the famous Carolina Gold rice crop.  She is plagued through the story by an unfiled land claim for the property of the plantation.  She takes some comfort in knowing the cottage is free and clear, so she will always have a home.  The books does a nice job of outlining the hard-to-believe conditions of the south after the Civil War.  So many families were adrift and the now free Negro laborers have to find their new place, too.  Well-to-do families were refined by the war and are struggling to manage their large homesteads, find a new way to make a livelihood, and deal with post-war stressors.  Charlotte develops a friendship with Nicholas B. who has returned from serving as a physician in the war.  Like the others, his story is rough and unfinished.  The story is forthright in illustrating many postwar hardships.  I appreciated the history lesson woven into the story. 

1 Comment

Filed under Book Reviews